Learning About Large-Scale Crowdfunding

Do you have a creative project you want to get off the ground? Do you have a brilliant idea you want to see realised? Do you run a creative organisation and want more freedom to make work? Do you want to reach a new or larger audience? Do you want to better understand how to crowdfund?

Understand crowdfunding to help you build a sustainable creative business, or project and reach a wider and more engaged network of supporters.

This workshop will help participants to identify how to target and engage new audiences, capitalise on networks and social media and develop a personalised strategy and timeline for micro-financing.

Crowdfunding should be part of a much wider fundraising plan and understanding the model can help you to build a sustainable business strategy. Crowdfunding enables artists and creative entrepreneurs to break down barriers.


This workshop can also be attended online via Skype, and the footage will be available for two weeks after the event for online participants along with any handouts, presentations and exercises.



Hen Norton is an independent Creative Producer and Documentary Artist.

As part of her creative practice, she documents conversations, narratives and stories. Through seeking out peoples real human stories, she is eager to discover ideas that help to re-frame, or re-present different societies and cultures.

As an extension of this work, she co-founded the crowd funding platform wedidthis.org.uk in January 2011.

Since the site's merger towards the end of 2012 with peoplefund.it (now crowdfunder.co.uk), she has turned her attentions to exploring how we can better understand the role of audience and use the crowdfunding model as a tool for the social and creative sectors to build sustainable business models, systems and networks.

She facilitates workshops and delivers talks across the UK and internationally.


This workshop is funded by Arts Funding & Philanthropy through their networks support. 

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